What is Sea-Buckthorn? Berry Beautiful Ingredient for Glowing Skin

By / 19th February, 2016 / Blog Category #1 / No Comments

What is Sea-Buckthorn? Berry Beautiful Ingredient for Glowing Skin

Zatik Natural skincare highlight: What is sea-buckthorn used for?

One of the allures of beauty care products is the magic of it all—the precise blending of precious ingredients that form luxurious treats for skin and hair. But before that alchemical magic happens, we must first identify the real magic—nature’s perfection—and select the highest quality ingredients.

Sea-buckthorn is one of those ingredients. Derived from the Latin word “Hippo”, which means horse, and “Phaos” for “shine”, the name of this potent plant is rooted in truth: The leaves and twigs of the sea buckthorn plants were long ago fed to livestock animals and horses. When the animals ate the sea-buckthorn, they became healthier, with shining coats and achieving healthy weight, giving this plant its deserving name.

What’s good for our animal friends isn’t always good for us, but that’s not the case for sea-buckthorn, particularly the distinctly orange berries. Used for more than a thousand years, sea-buckthorn has been revered in Chinese medicine for treatment of asthma, skin diseases, gastric ulcers, and lung disorders, says Zatik Natural’s co-founder and chief chemist Garik Mkrutmyan. “In Russia and Indian Himalayan region, sea-buckthorn was used for treatment of skin diseases, jaundice, asthma, for gastro-intestinal treatment, as laxative and for treatment of rheumatism. The infusion of dried berries was used for various skin diseases.”

Today, those ancient uses are being validated by research. Sea-buckthorn has clinically demonstrated antioxidant benefits, as well as stress-reducing, and tissue-repairing abilities. “Sea-buckthorn extract has been scientifically investigated and shown that it enhances acute and chronic dermal wound healing from burns [in rats],” says Garik.

It’s these benefits that make sea-buckthorn such a prized ingredient in Zatik’s products. Not only is it a fastidious skin healer, but it’s also a great source of vitamins A, C, E, K, riboflavin, and folic acid, as well as carotenoids, organic acids, animo acids, and polyunsaturated fatty acids that nurture the skin (and hair). In fact, sea-buckthorn is the only omega-rich oil with a 1:1 ratio of omega-3 to omega-6. It also contains a high concentration of omega-7 fatty acids—rare but highly beneficial oils.

We also love using sea-buckthorn because there are no known adverse side effects. That means it can be used generously and safely. But with a powerful ingredient like sea-buckthorn, a little goes a long way! We carefully formulate and balance our products to give you the maximum sea-buckthorn benefits for gorgeous, glowing skin.

Check out these Zatik sea-buckthorn products:

Sea-Buckthorn Apricot

Sea-Buckthorn & Apricot Soap Bar

 

References

Singh, V., 2005. Seabuckthorn (Hippophae L.) in traditional medicines. In: Singh, V. (Ed.), Seabuckthorn (Hippophae L.): A Multipurpose Wonder Plant, vol. 2. Daya Publishing House, New Delhi, India, pp. 505–521.

Singh, V., Moersel, Th., 2005. Development and commercialization of seabuckthorn: a German experience. In: Singh, V. (Ed.), Seabuckthorn (Hippophae L.): A Multipurpose Wonder Plant, vol. 2. Daya Publishing House, New Delhi, India, pp. 576–584.

Suleyman, H., Demirezer, L.O., Buyukokuroglu, M.E., Akcay, M.F., Gepdiremen, A., Banoglu, Z.N., Gocer, F., 2001. Antiulcerogenic effect of Hippophae rhamnoides. Phytotherapy Research 33, 77–81.

Upadhyay, N.K., Kumar, R., Mandotra, S.K., Meena, R.N., Siddiqui, M.S., Sawhney, R.C., Gupta, A., 2009. Safety and wound healing efficacy of sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) seed oil in experimental rats. Food and Chemical Toxicology 47, 1146–1153

Upadhyay, N.K., Kumar, R., Siddiqui, M.S., Gupta, A., 2011. Mechanism of wound healing activity of Hippophae rhamnoides L. leaf extract in experimental burns. Evidence based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, doi:10.1093/ecam/nep 189.

Basu, M., Prasad, R., Jayamurthy, P., Pal, K., Arumughan, C., Sawhney, R.C., 2007. Anti-atherogenic effects of Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides) seed oil. Phytomedicine 14, 770–777.

Chawla, R., Arora, R., Singh, S., Sagar, R.K., Sharma, R.K., Kumar, R., Sharma, A., Gupta, M.L., Singh, S., Prasad, J., Khan, H.A., Swaroop, A., Sinha, A.K., Gupta, A.K., Tripathi, R.P., Ahuja, P.S., 2007. Radioprotective and antioxidant activity of fractionated extracts of berries of Hippophae rhamnoides. Journal of Medicinal Food 10, 101–109.

Saggu, S., Divekar, H.M., Gupta, V., Sawhney, R.C., Banerjee, P.K., Kumar, R., 2007. Adaptogenic and safety evaluation of Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides)leaf extract: a dose dependent study. Food and Chemical Toxicology 45, 609–617

Gupta, A., Kumar, R., Pal, K., Singh, V., Banerjee, P.K., Sawhney, R.C., 2006. Influence of Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) flavone on dermal wound healing in rats. Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry 290, 193–198.

Upadhyay, N.K., Kumar, R., Mandotra, S.K., Meena, R.N., Siddiqui, M.S., Sawhney, R.C., Gupta, A., 2009. Safety and wound healing efficacy of sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) seed oil in experimental rats. Food and Chemical Toxicology 47, 1146–1153.

Upadhyay, N.K., Kumar, R., Siddiqui, M.S., Gupta, A., 2011. Mechanism of wound healing activity of Hippophae rhamnoides L. leaf extract in experimental burns. Evidence based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, doi:10.1093/ecam/nep 189.

Yang, B., Kallio, H.P., 2001. Fatty acid composition of lipids in Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) berries of different origins. Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry 49, 1939–1947.

Yang, B.,Kallio, H.P., 2005. Lipophilic components of Seabuckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) seeds and berries. In: Singh, V. (Ed.), Seabuckthorn (Hippophae L.): A multipurpose Wonder Plant, vol. 2. Daya Publishing House, New Delhi, India, pp. 70–97.

Pintea, A., Varga, A., Stepnowski, P., Socaciu, C., Culea, M., Diehl, H.A., 2005. Chromatographic analysis of carotenol fatty acid esters in Physalis alkekengi and Hippophae rhamnoides. Phytochemical Analysis 16, 188–195

Beveridge, T., Li, T.S.C., Oomah, B.D., 1999. Sea buckthorn products: manufacture and composition. Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry 47, 3480–3488.

Andersson, S.C., Olsson, M.E., Johansson, E., Rumpunen, K., 2009. Carotenoids in sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) berries during ripening and use of pheophytin a as a maturity marker. Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry 57, 250–258.

Yasukawa, K., Kitanaka, S., Kawata, K., Goto, K., 2009. Anti-tumor promoters phenolics and triterpenoid from Hippophae rhamnoides. Fitoterepia 80, 164–167.

Tulsawani,R., 2010. Ninety day repeated gavage administrationof Hipphophae rhamnoides extract in rats. Food and Chemical Toxicology 48, 2483–2489

Upadhyay, N.K., Kumar, R., Mandotra, S.K., Meena, R.N., Siddiqui, M.S., Sawhney, R.C., Gupta, A., 2009. Safety and wound healing efficacy of sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) seed oil in experimental rats. Food and Chemical Toxicology 47, 1146–1153

image: public domain photos